FIVE WAYS TO STAY SANE AS A WRITER

 

 

Five Ways to Stay Sane as a Writer – (by an author who lost her sanity a long time ago)

1.      BE PATIENT: If you’ve just written a novel, you may, like others, be eager to share it with the world, even though the prospect of doing so can be as daunting as it is exciting. Unfortunately, in their excitement, many authors query agents or self-publish way before their manuscripts are ready.

Take a deep breath. Relax. Remember, it’s much better to wait to put out your best work than to rush and put out a sloppy version of what could have been really good. Take time to edit and rewrite, then have a professional editor work on it. Putting out your best work will be a great boost to your mental health. Kicking yourself for not waiting isn’t helpful. Besides, you might hurt yourself.

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2.      COMPETE WITH YOURSELF FIRST: It’s easy to look around to see what everyone else is doing and wonder why your books aren’t selling as well as Joe Author’s books are. While you can learn a lot from watching how successful authors do things, don’t let the success or failure of others take over your thoughts. Don’t try to outwrite other authors; instead, outwrite yourself. Remember that you are a unique product. You’re not a carbon copy of anyone else and you shouldn’t be. Compete with yourself. Be the best writer you can be.

3.      FIGURE OUT HOW YOU WORK BEST: Some writers, while crafting their masterpiece, find it helpful to share with critique groups both on- and offline, as well as with family and friends. For others, the input of outsiders during the creative process can be stifling. Will the editorial critique help you more during or after the process of writing? What works best for you? Don’t make the mistake of sharing your work with ten different people and getting ten different opinions, unless you know it will galvanize you and not shut your muse down in frustration.

4.      DON’T LET SOCIAL MEDIA CONSUME YOU:  Building a platform on social media is very important. It’s not something that you should do when your book comes out; it’s something you should do at least six months prior to publication. That said, it can be addictive, exhausting, stressful, confusing or all of the above. Find a balance that works for you. Decide what amount of time is reasonable for each platform and try to adhere to that. Use the rest of your valuable time to create your product. Balance. Balance. Balance.

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5.      REMEMBER THAT NO WORK OF ART IS LIKED BY EVERYONE—EVER:  There is no book, no song, no painter, no singer, no movie, no TV show, no poet, no anything that is liked by everyone. Keep this in mind as you put your work out there. In a parallel universe, we want to believe that everyone will like our work, but they won’t. Do your best, define your style, put out your best work, and your readers will come.

Tell me, what methods have you attempted to keep your sanity? Have they worked?

 

 

CHAT WITH C.A. KUNZ

The mom and son author duo, C.A. Kunz, thoroughly enjoys writing about things that go bump in the night and futuristic action-packed romances while drinking massive amounts of English breakfast tea and Starbucks coffee.

Time to chat with C.A. Kunz!

What is your latest book?

Carol and Adam: The Modified, a young adult Dystopian novel.

Is your recent book part of a series?

Carol and Adam: Yes, it is book one of The Biotics Trilogy

If you were to advertise your book on a bumper sticker, what would it say?

Carol and Adam: What would YOU sacrifice?

What else have you written?

Carol and Adam: We’ve written the first two books in our middle grade/young adult paranormal series, The Childe. Our first book, The Childe, was published in March 2011 and the sequel, Dark Days, was published February 2012.

What do you think some of the greatest misconceptions about indie authors are?

Carol and Adam: That we’re not hard workers! Our first novel took us nine months to write. Then we had it edited, paid an experienced graphic designer to do our cover, and finally a year after we started, we published it. We do all the leg work and marketing to get our books out to the public. Though it’s hard work, we’re proud of what we’ve accomplished, and get a certain sense of satisfaction that our books are totally ours from cover to cover.

Is it important for you to know the ending of a book before you write it?

Carol and Adam: Yes, and since there are two of us that write the book, we not only have to know how the book will end, but we also need to have a concrete outline that we work from. If we didn’t, we’d probably end up with two completely different novels that don’t mesh. The title? Yes, because the title of the book tends to encompass the description of our book in our opinion.

Some writers edit excessively as they write; others wait until a novel is finished to do the bulk of the editing. How about you?

Carol and Adam: Our first book, The Childe, was a learning experience with many, many hours of editing throughout the whole novel. I have an office with a couch and a recliner and Adam and I have spent up to eleven hours a day editing while reading the story out loud. From what we learned from our first book, our second and third books were much easier.

Do you have any advice for first-time authors?

Carol and Adam: Don’t give up! Not everyone is going to like, or even love your book, and there are some really mean-spirited people who will try to tear you down. Ignore them. We know it’s hard, but you just have to do it. Look for people who will support you, but will also give you constructive criticism.

Please, tell us about your experiences with social media. What are your favorite and least-favorite parts of it?

Carol and Adam: Carol mainly attends the social media since Adam works full-time. She’s met some AWESOME people online, and when we go to events and book fairs we meet them in person and have an amazing time. It’s definitely time-consuming and hours fly by while online, but the rewards are well worth it!

Do you allow others to read your work in progress, or do you keep it a secret until you’ve finished your first draft?

Carol and Adam: We wait until our first draft is completely finished, then we give it to five or six people who read all different genres.  Can you elaborate? After their constructive criticism, we edit some more and when we feel like we have reached a point where it’s time for a professional editor to handle it!

Where do you live now? If you had to move to another city/state/country, where might that be?

Carol: I live in Florida but ideally I would love to live in England. My mum is English and my dad is American. I spent 15 years of my young life in England and I miss it.

Adam: I currently live in Orlando, Florida, but if I had to move to another place it would have to be New Zealand because it’s so darn beautiful there.

Trains, planes, automobiles, or boats?

Carol:  I love the first three, but I’m not a fan of boats. The Titanic movie is a horror movie for me. My worst fear is to be out in the middle of the ocean with no hope in sight.

Adam: I’d have to say trains…mainly due to my love of Harry Potter.

What’s your favorite comfort food? Least favorite food?

Carol: Bread, any kind of bread is my comfort food.  Mushrooms! Not into eating fungus.

Adam: Chips and queso are definitely my favorite comfort foods, and I have to agree with my mom and say that mushrooms are absolutely my least favorite.

What’s the coolest surprise you’ve ever had?

Carol: Finding out I was pregnant with Adam! He’s the best stomach flu I ever had!

Adam: Getting a four-star review for our first novel, The Childe, in the magazine RT Book Reviews.

What’s the best gift you’ve ever received?

Carol: Healthy Children.

Adam: A loving family.

What are the most important traits you look for in a friend?

Carol: Honesty and kindness. I strongly dislike catty and mean people. I would never intentionally hurt others feelings and I want to be with people who feel the same way.

Adam: I’d have to say honesty, loyalty, and positivity.

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