CHAT WITH C.A. ASBREY

Chris Asbrey has lived and worked all over the world in the Police Service, Civil Service, and private industry, working for the safety, legal rights, and security of the public. A life-changing injury meant a change of course into contract law and consumer protection for a department attached to the Home Office. She has produced magazine and newspaper articles based on consumer law and written guides for the Consumer Direct Website. She acted as a consultant to the BBC’s One Show and Watchdog, and been interviewed on BBC radio answering questions on consumer law to the public.

She lives with her husband and two daft cats in Northamptonshire, England—for now. She’s moving to the beautiful medieval city of York.

Time to chat with Chris!

What is your latest book?

The Innocents is the first in a trilogy of 19th century murder mysteries. My detective is a female Pinkerton and she has the skills the real women who performed that role really had; she is up to date with the modern detective methods of 1868, conversant with the sciences of the day, feisty, clever, and an expert at accents and disguises. She is nobody’s sidekick and goes in alone to collect intelligence– just like the real women did. In the first book she is sent in to help bring in the most cunning thief in the country, who also happens to be as forward-thinking and as interested in science as she is – except he uses it to commit better crime. When he saves her life, she owes him and resolves to bring in the murderer of a family friend. They find their respective skills dovetail perfectly, but if they’re found working together he could be jailed and she could be ruined forever. Neither of them bargained for their growing attraction either.

Is your recent book part of a series?

‘The Innocents’ is most definitely part of a larger body of work. It’s the first of a trilogy, but if people like them there’ plenty of scope to keep them going if there’s a demand. Each book is a self-contained mystery with the larger universe of the characters providing an over-arching connection between the books. The third book is written and at editing stage, but there are plenty of trials I can still put the characters through yet.

Do you write under a pen name? If so, can you tell us why?

I kinda do. I write under my married name and feature on social media under my maiden name for social interactions on line. I also write under initials. I don’t hide my gender, but it’s not immediately obvious when you look at the book cover.

How did you choose the genre you write in? Or did it choose you?

It definitely chooses me. I’ve loved mysteries all my life and read them voraciously all my life. I joined the adult section of the library at ten and read about three a week for years. I love the fact that there are there are rules to writing a mystery, and the writer has to keep to them if the reader is to be able to play along. The story has to keep moving, all the clues need to be available and the plot needs to be convincing. The rules were set out in ‘The Detective Club’ which featured members such as Agatha Christie, Dorothy Sayers, G. K. Chesterson, and E. C. Bentley. Not all the rules hold true today; for instance, “No Chinaman must figure in the story.” That is simply a ridiculous premise today. Agatha Christie broke another rule. “The detective must not himself commit the crime” but they still provide a framework for the modern mystery writer. The method of murdering the victim must be a robust and feasible technique and not invented or spurious. The motive for murder in a whodunit should be personal, and not an act of war or part of a professional hit. That takes the killing into a different genre of writing. I think that pushing the boundaries in the mystery have to be done by taking the reader with you. It’s a really interactive medium and a mental game.

If you were to advertise your book on a bumper sticker, what would it say?

He was wanted. She wanted him more than anyone else.

How often do your characters surprise you by doing or saying something totally unexpected?

I love it when they do that. One minor character took over and grew into a major one. Another decided to kill herself and left me wondering how to write my way out of this one. When creativity starts to play it’s important to go with it. It makes for a far more interesting plot.

Is it important for you to know the ending of a book before you write it? The title?

I do start with a title, but it can change as the story proceeds. For some reason I need a hook to hang the story on. The ending can definitely change, and often has. I need to keep track of clues, red herrings, characters, and even aliases, but somehow it all comes together. In some plots it’s vital to know the ending. The third book in the trilogy is a howdunit. We know who kills and why, but my characters have to prove how he kills in a case which stretches their forensic skills to the limit.

Some writers edit excessively as they write; others wait until a novel is finished to do the bulk of the editing. How about you?

I always re-read what I wrote the day before and edit as I go but when I finish, I re-read and edit as well as sending the book out to trusted friends and beta readers who not only edit, but would point out any plot holes and scenes which don’t work. That results in more edits until the manuscript is honed and exactly as I want it.

Have you ever imagined what your characters are doing after you’ve finished a book or series?

Oh, yes. I’m already thinking what will happen in the fourth as I promote the first.

How much research was involved in writing your book? How did you go about it?

Copious amounts. ‘The Innocents’ has taken years of research into the early Pinkertons, especially the female agents and the kind of work they did, including their methodologies. I research everything, even the stationary, or the correct codes for the telegraph stations mentioned in the books. The theatrical make up, used as disguises in the book, began to flourish right around the period the books are set in. Lighting had improved and people could see the flaws in the rudimentary makeup used previously on stages lit by candles.

Greasepaint was invented in the 1860s by Ludwig Leichner, building on the work of Karl Freidrich Baudius (1796–1860) in the 1850s. Lighting also improved costumes and acting techniques. It drove a desire for more natural representations in every area, simply because people could see the stage more clearly. Crepe hair went out and quality wigs came in. Colors were mixed to mimic skin tones and classes in their application were popular in the acting profession. Latex wasn’t invented until 1920, but prior to that rubber was molded or even applied to a light fabric backing. When it was the right shape it was expertly painted to look exactly like a nose, dewlap, bald cap, or any other body part. I even researched whether someone with as much hair as the average Victorian woman could wear a short wig. The answer came from a young woman who enjoys cosplay—and she explains online how to pleat her long, thick hair and coil it flat under the cap before putting the short wig on. It absolutely IS possible.

The forensics are fascinating to dig into too. You name it I researched, right down to what shades of clothes were available at that time. I don’t want all that to become a lesson to the reader though. It should be a backwash, a setting in which the plot unfolds. I’m first and foremost a storyteller and I want to carry the reader with the tale and not have them worrying about whether something was available at the time or whether it was possible.

I do enjoy finding things which seem like anachronisms but were actually invented much earlier than people think, but I have my characters discuss these things so it’s clear I’ve done my homework. I have a blog where I detail the strange, obscure, and the things too mundane to be taught in history classes. I was very flattered to be told by another writer that they’d used it as a resource.

CONNECT WITH CHRIS:

Blog (all things obscure and strange in the Victorian period)

Facebook (The Innocent Mystery Series Group)

Facebook

Twitter

Amazon

Goodreads

CHAT WITH INGRID FOSTER

Fantasy Suspense Author Ingrid Foster lists Pennsylvania Farm Girl, Veteran, World Traveler and Desert Dweller among her many descriptors. Having written her first story when she was eight, she didn’t officially get the writing bug until January 2005. She currently lives in the Sonoran Desert with her husband and furry babies.

What is your latest book?

My Fantasy Suspense novel entitled My Father’s Magic just went into print and later this year I plan to publish my second book in the Esme Bohlin Suspense Series, Revenge of the Dark Queen.

How did you choose the genre you write in? Or did it choose you?

It chose me. My Instructor at Long Ridge Writer’s Group, Lynne Smith, told me after reading Fresh Meat, that I was a natural for the horror genre. But she never had a chance to read my novel, My Father’s Magic. While having some horrific elements, it is truly what I call Fantasy Suspense. It has the immediate telling of the villain of the story and the fast pace of a suspense novel while in a contemporary fantasy setting. So, in truth, I waffle between the darker stuff like with my Dark Desert Tales and the Fantasy, but all of it is dark, fantasy-based and an entertaining ride from start to finish.

Are your characters ever based on people you know?

Not intentionally, but there are some personality similarities between my characters and people I know in real life.

What else have you written?

I’ve published two short stories from my Dark Desert Tales Collection, “Fresh Meat” and “A Home for Rose.” Both will be included in a somewhat altered state and along with one novella, one novelette and a surprise story in my upcoming book, The Dark Desert Tales Collection, to be published next year.

What do you think some of the greatest misconceptions about indie authors are?

That their books are poorly edited and unprofessional. The vast majority of Indie Authors spend a great deal of time on their craft, they value their readers and want to provide the best product they possibly can. Like many others, going Indie was not a hasty decision. I researched both avenues, listened to more experienced authors both Publishing House published and Indie and finally decided to go Indie with my own brand name, Lucky Nut Press. I wanted the freedom to make choices that were right for me and my stories without having to yield to the latest market trends and big house bottom lines.

How often do your characters surprise you by doing or saying something totally unexpected?

All the time, every day and I wouldn’t have it any other way!

Some writers edit excessively as they write; others wait until a novel is finished to do the bulk of the editing. How about you?

The first book, I edited each chapter as I went. I stopped doing that. I see it as two completely different mindsets. I keep early mornings for writing and late mornings or afternoons for editing.

After working for a very long time on a novel, many authors get to a point where they lose their objectivity and feel unable to judge their own work. Has this ever happened to you? If so, what have you done about it?

Yes, after five years on My Father’s Magic I was done so I chose some objective people and had them read it. After two editors and a team of beta readers, the book was ready to publish.

What are some of the crazy things people have said to you upon learning you are an author? How have you responded?

“Oh, I’ve got a great story idea for you!” or they’ve sent me their stories without asking, expecting me to read them and give a glowing opinion. But, I didn’t choose writing, it chose me. So, IMO, we all have a need to write as a way to vent, but just because you do that doesn’t mean you’re a writer. A writer is someone who has to write, it’s as natural as breathing and we are happiest when writing. If you don’t have that drive, that desire and passion to write, look around you, your talent and passion are most likely doing something else.

Have you ever written characters that you truly despise?

Yes, the antagonist in My Father’s Magic. He had a lot of the same characteristics of someone from my past. Someone I came to despise. Needless to say, I was glad when my main character (protagonist) Esme kicked his ass.

Do you have any advice for first-time authors?

Read everything, inside your favorite genre and outside and then when the need to write becomes so intense that you have no choice, write and write and write. Reading feeds your inner writer, gives you ability to think outside the box and original ideas and concepts are what sells. If you want to write something that’s been hashed a thousand different ways like vampires, come up with a different take on vampires or at least a character that is close to home for you.

Can you tell us about your road to publication?

I’m 55 years old, I devoted my life to writing January 2005. That’s when I stopped fighting my inner writer. Long story, very personal, let’s just say a well-meaning family member convinced the 17-year-old me that giving into my need to write would drive me slowly insane. Over the past few years I’ve learned too things, that cutting off my need to write hurt me more mentally than writing ever could, and two, to embrace all of me, the good, the bad, the ugly, and the crazy. A whole life is a happy life. But back to being published, after a dozen or so query letters I decided writing was a much better use of my time and then when I decided to go Indie, a good friend helped me self-publish my first story, “Fresh Meat.” I’m a fast learner, so I was then able to epublish “A Home for Rose,” and My Father’s Magic.

What do you like best about the books you read? What do you like least?

I absolutely love a story that grabs me from the first paragraph. If a story doesn’t do that, most likely it won’t later and I’ll pass on it.

How much research was involved in writing your book? How did you go about it?

A lot. It took me five years to write My Father’s Magic and a lot of that was because I researched Goddess worship, Paganism, the European Germanic Migration and other topics along the way.

Is there a question I haven’t asked you that you would like to answer?

Where did the idea for My Father’s Magic come from?

After a few years of writing other stories, I got the feeling I had an emotional block inside me that needed to be addressed. Writing has always allowed me to explore my feelings. I’ve always wanted to tell my story, but when I started writing a memoir, the ADHD part of me said, “Boring!” So I decided, “Why not tell your story but in a fictional, fantasy way?”

So I drew a map of a fictional place on a whiteboard and the magical village of Albion was born. Then I started coming up with characters and even though the characters are not me or people I know, I used a lot of my own background, emotions and experiences to write this book.

Do you feel your latest book is your personal favorite or one of your previous novels?

Is it wrong to say your own novel is your absolute favorite read? In truth, I write stories that I myself enjoy. I believe that if I’m not enjoying the story, my readers won’t either, and so I write for me. It’s an absolute pleasure and bonus when others enjoy my stories as much as I do.

Having our work out there to be judged by strangers is often daunting for writers. Do you have any tips on handling a negative review?

The only negative reviews really involved my two Dark Desert Tales, basically that they were too short. So with that in mind, I decided to take them back to the drawing board and explore ways I can increase their story line. I wrote them both to meet assignment requirements for a class I was taking, that’s why they’re short. But with the freedom to expand and allow my characters to spread their wings, it will be fun to see what happens.

Do you miss spending time with your characters when you finish writing them?

Yes, always. My first book was about five friends and even though I couldn’t quite get the story to work I never forgot my five friends. A couple years back I put them into another story. It’s pretty much the same location, but a different plot and it will most likely be a trilogy.

Have you ever wished that you could bring a character to life? If so, which one and why?

I have this adorable little creature in My Father’s Magic that takes a bigger role in Revenge of the Dark Queen. He has six spider legs and two cat legs complete with paws. His fur is as soft as cashmere and changes color to reflect his mood. He has large Onxy eyes and he’s the last (as far as we know) of his species thanks to an flea-carrying plague that took place in the human world centuries before. I’d love for him to come to life.

If you were to advertise your book on a bumper sticker, what would it say?

I brake for katzenspinders!

A lot of authors are frustrated by readers who don’t understand how important reviews are? What would you say to a reader who doesn’t think his or her review matters?

Have you ever started out to write one book and ended up with something completely different?

LOL, yes, The Gathering, the novella that will come out in my Dark Desert Tales collection, started out being about a middle-aged couple moving into a haunted apartment complex in southern Arizona. It’s now about a young widow who returns to southern Arizona to spread her husband’s ashes as promised. Unfortunately almost at the same time, a construction project disturbs a buried pile of ancient bones and all hell is about to break loose.

What’s the coolest surprise you’ve ever had?

Okay, this may be a little morbid. But I had a near-fatal car accident in 1994. After five days in ICU and pretty much out of it, I woke up to see my two-sisters entering my hospital room. Mind you, I’m the youngest of four by eight years and as we are spread all over the country it had been years since I saw them. Having them there when I opened my eyes was the absolute best surprise!

If you could have one skill that you don’t currently have, what would it be?

I’d love to learn how to fly helicopters.

What was the most valuable class you ever took in school? Why?

My 5th Grade English class. I was in a bad place regarding school until 5th Grade, mainly because of severe dysfunctional issues at home. My parents divorced when I was in 5th Grade ending my severe abandonment issues and for the first time I could focus on school. I’ll never forget setting at my desk working in my Language Skills workbook and it seemed like everything opened up to me and I began my life-long love of words.

What’s your favorite film of all times? Favorite book?

I have three movies: The Long Kiss Goodnight, Something’s Gotta Give, and Love Actually

Favorite books: The Prophetess by Barbara Wood, Stephen King’s It and William Shakespeare’s Hamlet

Do you have any guilty pleasures?

Doesn’t everyone? 🙂 Okay, mint chocolate chip ice cream and key lime or lemon meringue pie

What simple pleasure makes you smile?

Spending time with my family, a child’s laughter and walking my dog.

 

CONNECT WITH INGRID

Website

Amazon

Blog

Facebook Author Page

Twitter

Goodreads

CHAT WITH STEPHEN M DAVIS

 

Steve was the grandson to a Thames-Docker, and son of a schizophrenic, alcoholic mother. Life on the streets of East London in the 60s was a testing time for him. In 1971, he moved to rural Essex aged 14-years. At 16-years old, he was in a house fire, leaving him with life-threatening injuries, which resulted in nine minutes on the other side. He believes he was given a second chance to write about Rebecca.

He went on to work for Royal Mail for 32 years, retiring at the age of 52. He then turned his attention to writing, aiming to improve his use of the English language. It took him five years to recognise his literary voice was a feminine one. Unbeknown to him, Rebecca had been waiting patiently.

Time to chat with Steve!

Is your recent book part of a series?

I only ever intended Rebecca & the Spiral Staircase to be a one-off story chronicling the adventures of a 15-year-old girl. I had finished – or so I thought – and was preparing my novel for a launch date. Then from nowhere, my beloved Rebecca called me for one final chapter. This chapter changed everything, and opened the door for Rebecca, A Way Back, and more…

Do you write under a pen name? If so, can you tell us why?

My name is my name. I write with a feminine voice, but even son, a guy writing about a 15-year-old girl raised a few eyebrows. It was suggested I changed my name and instead choose a female pseudonym. I wasn’t comfortable with that, especially as it is so hard to spell ha ha.

How did you choose the genre you write in? Or did it choose you?

 Aha, that’s an interesting, and in my case, fascinating question. When I first decided to get some words down on paper, a manly sci-fi novel seemed to be the obvious choice. After a couple of years of trudging my way through this story, I realised that either I didn’t fit it or it didn’t fit me. I tried some alternative styles with little joy. I was seemingly lost in literary oblivion. Then from nowhere, Rebecca called me. The moment I started typing she was there waiting. I had found my voice, and genre. Rebecca chose me.

If you were to advertise your book on a bumper sticker, what would it say?

Adults lose their ability to see.

How often do your characters surprise you by doing or saying something totally unexpected?

My girl closes the front door and always turns left. Even though I have a set route or plan for Rebecca, she’s rarely prepared to be led, and instead chooses an unforeseen direction. When she speaks, however, I know how she thinks and responds. Either, I am in her head, or she’d in mine, so there’s rarely a surprise.

Is it important for you to know the ending of a book before you write it? The title?

Oh, if only it were that simple. With an individual like Rebecca, there is no way she’d allow me or anyone else to pre-empt the ending. As with her first chronicle, just when I thought it was done-n-dusted, she shouted an alternative conclusion.

 How important is the choosing of character names to you? Have you ever decided on a name and then changed it because it wasn’t right for the character?

That’s quite a provocative question. Generally, the personalities of my characters or their roles within my novel will ultimately determine their name. I can see everyone’s individual’s facial expression, appearance, and characteristics, which mostly results in a perfect name fit. Sometimes though, I have no choice but consider era appropriate names as with Meredith, a lady from 1853. Rebecca, however, picked her name, and I went along with it because it suited her perfectly. I subsequently discovered that Rebekha was the wife of Isaac in the Hebrew Bible and one of the four original female names.

There are so many conflicting opinions out there about everything related to publishing: e-book pricing, book promotion, social media usage etc. How do you sort through it all to figure out what works best for you?

At the get go, I struggled deciding the right publication route for my novel. Initially, I believed the conventional road via a literary agent was the only way for my girl. I soon realised that in these times of austerity, a new author book deal was always going to be a difficult direction. Literary agents receive an endless list of proposals and invariably your beloved novel, can, and will end up on the ‘slush-pile’, even if your story is outstanding. I tried six agents and although their response was positive, there was always a, “at the moment, we cannot consider new authors.” Interestingly, I didn’t get one auto “thanks but no thanks” reply. Although frustrated, I was actually spurred on by their positive comments. I then looked at the e-book route, and decided to let Rebecca loose on the world. Ultimately, the readers decide if your tale is good enough, and so it has proven with a phenomenal response.

I do use social media as a platform for my novel and this has had a mixed response. I write an angling blog, and with a constant world-wide audience, I used that to promote my novel. Although my fishing blog employs a somewhat different literary voice, it led to a few sales. I also run an angling forum via Facebook, and this platform produced a decent level of sales. Of interest, all the female anglers who read my book openly shared their enjoyment. The male anglers, however, showed their pleasure via private messages. Mostly though, Twitter has been a fantastic method of promoting for my novel. I believe that providing you are proactive and engage your followers, then they will – it would seem – purchase your book once they get to know you.

I spoke with an employee of a large UK book store, and he had an interesting view on independently published books. He explained that while at university, he was tasked with exploring the indie author route. He suggested that over ninety-five percent of e-books are “rubbish,” and that if you have a good story, and it is well written, then it will, in time, rise up through the ranks. His view was that reviews, an attention grabbing cover, a fascinating tale, and believable characters are the keys to success.

Are you a fast typist? Does your typing speed (or lack of it) affect your writiing?

Even if I could type five-hundred words a minute, Rebecca’s tale manifests itself at her pace, with the hands of the clock seemingly motionless. So no matter how fast I want to go, she keeps slowing me down, allowing her time to consider her direction.

Do you write anything besides novels? Care to share?

 As I said earlier, I write an angling blog. Interestingly, readers often say they feel they have been on a fishing expedition with me. Many have said that Rebecca takes you by the hand and leads you through every turn. Although the two are written with a slightly different literary voice, it appears, they both engage the reader in a similar way.

How would you define your style of writing?

 It has been said on a number of occasions, by many, that I have a feminine voice. My intended style is to engage people with thought provoking, between the lines, suggestions. I hope my readers are left unsure, wondering if the events surrounding Rebecca’s journey actually happen. Ultimately, I trust them to find the alternative, unforeseen conclusion. After all, I didn’t see it coming…

Have you ever wished that you could bring a character to life? If so, which one and why?

I don’t know what you could possibly mean. All my characters are alive, thriving, and very well, thank you for asking.

A lot of authors are frustrated by readers who dont understand how important reviews are? What would you say to a reader who doesn’t think his or her review matters?

Reviews are king of the hill… Readers trust independent opinions. Today, the internet dominates people’s decisions. Those going to a new restaurant, holiday resort, or hotel, will check reviews first. Why would it be any different for a book?

Where do you live now? If you had to move to another city/state/country, where might that be?

I currently live with my wife in Essex, just north of London. We hope to move soon to rural Suffolk, known as ‘Constable Country’. It is a beautiful county, with lovely people, an amazing history, and stunning old houses.

Trains, planes, automobiles, or boats?

We prefer boats, or in our case, ships. My wife and I love to cruise and have most recently returned from a fifty night cruise that took us from Southampton, across the Atlantic, around the Caribbean, Latin America, along the coast of North America, and back home. We cannot wait for the next one, so buy my book 😉

What are the most important traits you look for in a friend?

A two way road of honesty and compassion without an agenda is important to me. Knowing they are there for you no matter what, and that you feel the same.

 Care to brag about your family?

I have been married to Jacqui for 38 years, and she is still my best friend. Before she retired, she was the court manager at the world famous ‘Old Bailey’, Central Criminal Court, in London. Our son, Ryan is currently resident in Vancouver, Canada living the dream. He is super intelligent, getting his brains from his mother, a fantastic footballer (soccer), and an honest individual.

CONTACT STEPHEN

Website

Amazon

Twitter

Angling Blog

 

CHAT WITH ELLIE DOUGLAS

Ellie Douglas loves horror and she wants to scare you. She is the author of the Hounded Series, Fear Inducer, Toxic Desire, The Dead Undone and the Dead Wake Anthology. Her passion and love of horror drives her and she strives to spook you. Ellie also creates adult coloring books and makes professional book covers, all of which she thoroughly enjoys doing.

Time to chat with Ellie!

What is your latest book(s)?

I have two new books that were published in December 2017. The Dead Undone is a tale set in a haunted asylum; the ghosts and paranormal activity are the least of the worries that the characters have. For their greatest fears are the dead rising. My second book, The Dead Wake Anthology, is all about zombies in bizarre, funny, and also serious situations. It’s a book of ten shorts that will raise emotions within the reader that they never thought possible when it comes to zombies.

Is your recent book part of a series?

It might be, though I don’t want to sound cryptic, my books can all become a series but I haven’t any plans at this stage to do so.

What are the greatest challenges in writing short stories?

The greatest challenge I found in writing my short stories was where to end them. Once I managed that it was a home stretch from then onwards.

Do you write under a pen name? If so, can you tell us why?

Yes my first name Ellie is my chosen pen name that I got from my real name with a combination of my real first names letters. The reason for the first name change was because there is another author out there with my name and I didn’t want readers getting confused with who is who.

How did you choose the genre you write in? Or did it choose you?

Both. The genre horror chose me and I also chose it. I tried my hand at a thriller but always found myself going back to my love of horror. Are your characters ever based on people you know?

Not directly, but some of my characters are based off of people’s personalities. In particular, my own children have inspired me with the different personalities that I see in them.

I hear you have some very exciting news! Can you share it with us?

I am pregnant with aliens? No, my exciting news is that I just released two novels and that is pretty exciting.

If you were to advertise your book on a bumper sticker, what would it say?

Eat me!

What else have you written?

I’ve written six novels in total now. The Hounded series, book 1 and 2, Fear Inducer, Toxic Desire, The Dead Undone, and The Dead Wake Anthology. Is it important for you to know the ending of a book before you write it? The title?

No. I tend to fine tune the story as I go along, so the ending can change and has done multiple times. The title is either going to be extremely hard to reach for me in particular or easy. It just depends on the story. Sometimes I’ve come up with a title before I’ve even written the story and other times I’ve struggled with a title.

Some writers edit excessively as they write; others wait until a novel is finished to do the bulk of the editing. How about you?

I do both, or have been known to do both. I’ll start off editing as I go. Then I’ll be so into the story that I just write it. Then I’ll go back and edit.

Have you ever imagined what your characters are doing after you’ve finished a book or series?

Yes, in particular my characters from my Hounded series. I often ponder about what they are doing. What are some of the crazy things people have said to you upon learning you are an author? How have you responded?

The craziest remark I’ve ever received was a simple word; ‘Really?’ to which I simply replied back, ‘yes’. I do so with a large smile and big wide eyes.

Are you easily distracted while writing? If so, what to you do to help yourself focus?

Yes, I’m very easily distracted. If I get distracted I have to stop. I’ll handle whatever has distracted me and then see if I can pick up from where I was. If not, I’ll do some reading, clean the house, watch TV or a movie and then get back into my writing.

Authors, especially Indies, are constantly trying to understand why some authors sell very while their talented fellow authors have a hard time of it. It’s an ongoing conundrum. What do you make of it all?

I believe it just comes down to who you know as well as having a massive financial backing. Without word of mouth and money in droves it is hard to do the advertising to get noticed.

We all know the old saying; you can’t judge a book by its cover. This is true. However, how much importance do you place on your book cover design?

I place a huge importance on my books cover that probably is because I’m a book cover designer so it has to be perfect. Being a perfectionist aids in that largely too.

Do you have complete control over your characters or do they ever control you?

I have full control over my characters, though in my latest novel, The Dead Undone, one of the characters decided to kill himself and I had to bring him back as he was pretty vital to the story. Lol

Do you ever suffer from writer’s block? If so, how do you get around it?

I have once and how I handled it was walking away from my writing. I ended up leaving it for a period of two long weeks and then when I returned and re read what I had already written the writer’s block was gone and I was able to continue forward. 🙂  

Where do you live now? If you had to move to another city/state/country, where might that be?

I live where I was born, Auckland New Zealand. If I could chose another country I would go to England.

Trains, planes, automobiles, or boats?

Boats and trains.

What’s your favorite comfort food? Least favorite food?

Favorite comfort food would be anything junk. lol Least favorite food is fish or basically seafood.

If you could be invisible for a day, what would you do?

Rob a bank! OK, I wouldn’t do that umm if I were to be invisible for a day I would go around giving everyone a terrible fright. It’d be fun to scare them silly.

What’s the best gift you’ve ever received?

OK this is going to sound absolutely corny and it isn’t an actual gift but the best gift I’ve ever received is ‘Life’ 🙂

What are the most important traits you look for in a friend?

Honesty and outgoing.

Care to brag about your family?

Yes, they are all zombies. LOL I have four children and a wonderful supportive husband. One of my sons is going into medical science and I couldn’t be more proud. My youngest, the twin girls, are still in college and one of them is very artistic and creative, and has told me she’ll be an author and artist one day just like her mamma (That’s me). lol The other is going to be a saver of animals and wants to travel to places around the world to do so. Very ambitious 🙂 My oldest son has just had a baby and so yes I’m now a grand mamma 🙂 I love my family very much 🙂

What might we be surprised to know about you?

You might be surprised to know that I invented a slots machine game called Infinity slots, unrelated to the one on Facebook, mine is ad free and one that you actually win, true to the name of (Infinity) 🙂

What makes you angry?

Twitter jail! What is twitter jail I hear some of you ask? Well it is when you tweet your daily limit of tweets and then you are told by Twitter with a message that says; you have exceeded your daily limit and must wait a few hours before you can continue. That ticks me off just a little. The only other thing that makes me angry is bad drivers. Those drivers that are putting on makeup and holding up the lights to go. Those drivers who are on their phones and turn without looking almost causing a head on etc. Yeah, those!

What music soothes your soul?

Mostly any music is soothing. I’m very found of the 80’s and also of the latest stuff being released. Shakira is currently one of my favorites and one of my twin daughters is currently right into K-Pop and I have to admit some of that is rather catchy and I often find myself singing along and moving to the beat of the music.

What was the most valuable class you ever took in school? Why?

Can there be two? If so it would have to be Art and English because they gave me the abilities to be what I am today, an artist and an author.

If you are a TV watcher, would you share the names of your favorite shows with us?

This might take a while there is a few. lol

The 100

The Walking Dead

The Fear of the Walking

The Preacher

Ash Vs Evil

The Strain

Grey’s Anatomy

X-Factor

Super girl

Flash

Inhumans

Lethal Weapon

American Housewife

Little Sheldon

Take me out

Blind Date

There are a lot more. I happen to love TV and movies 🙂

If you could add a room onto your current home, what would you put in it?

Funny that this question is here as it is something that has been on my mind a lot lately. If I had the chance to add another room, I’d fill it with a large screen TV and DVD player so I could put in a treadmill and watch movies while walking 🙂

Have you ever walked out of a movie? If so, what was it?

I have. When I was 11 years old I was taken to see The Deer Hunter and well being a tender young age I couldn’t handle what I was seeing so I left. Much to the dismay of the friend that had taken me.

What simple pleasure makes you smile?

Seeing my kids laughing and giggling and having a good time. Seeing them grow before my very eyes. Watching movies and singing when no one can hear me, and trust me no one wants to hear me singing. But I love to sing out loud when no one is listening. Talking to my friends, and making them laugh.

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